From Our President: Native Fruits Attract Many Birds

Throughout the summer and fall months, I watch birds use the berry-producing trees and shrubs on our property. The fruit is a magnet for many birds and gives them a wonderful diet supplement during the breeding season and migration. Many bird species have at least a partially frugivorous diet and will eat fruit regularly.

Conservation Column Sep 2014: Football Stadium Design Is Dangerous for Birds

Debbie Schlenoff


Sports teams have often branded themselves with animal monikers (hello, Duck fans!). Football teams borrow from our feathered friends—the Arizona Cardinals, Atlanta Falcons, Baltimore Ravens, Philadelphia Eagles, Seattle Seahawks. So it is sadly ironic that the massive football stadium under construction in Minneapolis will result in a large and unnecessary number of bird deaths. The new Vikings stadium, located on a migratory flyway next to the Mississippi River, features large expanses of glass (200,000 square feet) and is expected to kill thousands of birds if built as originally designed. Birds don’t see glass and will attempt to fly through the invisible barrier, only to be brought up short when they collide with the glass. The collisions are often fatal.

Bon Voyage to Vaux’s Swifts at Agate Hall

Friday, September 12 and Friday, September 26

The LCAS Swift Events are wonderful opportunities to observe Vaux’s Swifts as they enter the Agate hall chimney to roost for the night. Join LCAS at sunset at 17th Avenue and Agate Street. See the LCAS website or call 541.343.8664 for more information.

Date: 
Friday, September 12, 2014 - 7:00pm
Location: 
Chimney outside Agate Hall on the University of Oregon campus

52 Small Birds Now Available

A new book by Richard Weeks, 52 Small Birds, is now available! The book is a memoir of an eight-year quest to photograph and paint the 52 breeding warblers of the United States, and Richard’s beautiful artwork appears throughout the story. According to the author, “This narrative relates how the process of searching for, photographing, and painting birds enhanced and deepened my connection to the natural world.” Published in cooperation with LCAS, 52 Small Birds sells for $22 plus $2 shipping. It’s also available at LCAS monthly meetings for $20. All profits go to LCAS.
 
To order and for more information about the book and author, go to www.rweeksart.com.

Have Some Fun—Volunteer!

Lane County Audubon Society is an all-volunteer organization, and our members are very proud of the energy and diverse talents that volunteers bring to our cause—we couldn’t do it without them! Volunteering with Lane Audubon is a great way to meet new people, give back to the community, and best of all, have fun!
 
If you’re interested in volunteering for one of the opportunities below, or if you have other ideas about ways you can help, contact Maeve Sowles at 541.343.8664 or president (at) laneaudubon.org.
 

Lane County Community Outreach Help introduce Lane Audubon to community members at local events and present talks on birding and the natural world to small groups upon request. Help develop our “speaker bureau” materials and resources. This is a great opportunity to use your creativity and get involved in community outreach for Lane County Audubon! 
 
Quail Distributor - Help us distribute The Quail to high-visibility locations in our community in an effort to recruit new members. This task requires only a couple of hours of your time nine times per year, and it is a huge help! Contact Ron Renchler at 541.345.0834 or christyandron (at) qwest.net for more information. 
 
Booth Coordinator - Help with our booth appearances at local events and festivals. This opportunity involves setting up and taking down the booth four or five times a year and scheduling other volunteers to staff the booth at events. One or two people could share or split these duties. We will provide orientation and training. If you enjoy coordinating activities and working with people, this could be the opportunity for you. For more information, contact Ron Renchler at 541.345.0834 or christyandron (at) qwest.net.
 
Audubon in the Schools Program Coordinator - The Audubon in the Schools (AITS) curriculum, developed by Kris Kirkeby, our former Education Chair, comprises five fun-filled lessons that combine bird biology and basic art techniques. It is designed to provide elementary students with a solid introduction to core aspects of bird biology, including bird feather anatomy and function, bird identification techniques, bird field marks, and habitat. The lessons are excellent examples of participatory education. The coordinator keeps all facets of the program going, including classroom scheduling and volunteer training, and also teaches lessons to students along with the other volunteers. We hope to find a new coordinator who can take this wonderful education program to new heights!
 
Program Chair - The Program Chair recruits speakers for the chapter Program Meetings that are scheduled eight times a year. This person seeks new programs that will enhance our members’ awareness of birding, habitats, natural history, conservation, and other issues, and he or she must be able to engage speakers and organize publicity and other logistics well in advance of each meeting.