From Past Presidents: Where Have All My Birds Gone?

“Where Have All MY Birds Gone?”

That is the question I hear dozens of times a year while answering the Audubon Phone. Lane County Audubon Society (LCAS) has a phone number people call, seeking answers to all sorts of nature-related questions. We receive calls about injured wildlife, impending nearby “development” that will destroy wildlife habitat, neighborhood cats, feeding birds, bird identification, swifts at Agate Hall, building a bird house, buying bird seed, buying binoculars, and more. But for the past several years some of the most common and desperate calls have been concerning the reduction or even total lack of birds in their yards.

Conservation Column: Ideas—Good and Bad

“The way to get good ideas is to get lots of ideas, and throw the bad ones away.” – Linus Pauling

We’ve all heard the expression “There’s no such thing as a bad idea,” but I think many would disagree. Unfortunately, on the environmental front, many bad ideas have recently been proposed. Thankfully, many of these ideas have not been implemented. I list a few below. 

CANCELLED DUE TO COVID19 CONCERNS SEE LINK BELOW Program Meeting, Tuesday, March 24

Although the program was cancelled, you can read the article on red knots and see Janet's paintings in this Orion magazine article: https://orionmagazine.org/article/flight-of-the-red-knot/

In a slide show of her original paintings, Janet Essley explores the fascinating life cycles of these long-distance migrants, their amazing physiology, and the conservation challenges they face. The Red Knot, Calidis canutus, a medium-sized sandpiper, is a regular guest along the Oregon Coast during its spring and fall migrations. Extremists among sandpipers, Red Knots migrate longer distances, breed farther north, display faster beach-probing feeding maneuvers, and ingest harder-shelled mollusks than other sandpipers. Recording scientific knowledge through art forms from around the world, Essley’s project Cultural Cartography of Red Knots (visit theredknotsproject.org), is a unique collage of human and avian natural history. Research for this project has immersed Essley in shorebird scientific studies and an astounding variety of human artistic expression from around the world.  If nothing else, she says, studying migrating birds teaches us that the world is one shared home. 

Date: 
Tuesday, March 24, 2020 - 7:00pm
Location: 
Eugene Garden Club, 1645 High St, Eugene

Third Saturday Bird Walk - April 18, 8:00 am

Gerry Meenaghan will lead the April walk at LCC. 

All ages and skill levels are welcome. Bring binoculars, if you have them. To carpool, meet at 8 a.m. at the South Eugene High School parking lot, corner of 19th and Patterson. We plan to return by noon. Remember that it’s not a good idea to leave valuables or your vehicle registration in your car if you leave it at the lot. A $3 donation is appreciated to help support Lane County Audubon’s activities.

Date: 
Saturday, April 18, 2020 - 8:00am
Location: 
Meet to carpool at South Eugene HS

Volunteers Needed: Audubon in the Schools, Binoculars Needed, Booth Staffing Scheduler, and more

Audubon in the Schools

The Audubon in the Schools team has been doing a wonderful job bringing this educational program into our schools. Volunteer instructors have also presented some beginning birding classes for the Outdoor Schools Program. In 2019 the overall number of students who enjoyed these sessions was 1,286! We gave 48 presentations in 23 schools. 

Schools are requesting more AITS classroom visits than ever, so we need more volunteers to help out! If you are interested in helping and being a part of this talented group, please contact Maeve Sowles at audubon@laneaudubon.org.

Binoculars Needed

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Short-eared Owl Surveyors Needed

Volunteers are invited to help gather data for the largest Short-eared Owl study in the world! This community science project covers eight states. To participate, potential surveyors sign-up for a survey grid and complete two 90-minute road-based surveys from March through May. All of the specifics can be found on the project website: WAfLS project website. Sign up asap for the most location options!

To learn more and to sign-up: Contact Nate Trimble by email at nlt@KlamathBird.org or by calling 541-201-0866 ext. 5;

Visit the Project WAfLs Website https://www.avianknowledgenorthwest.net/citizen-science/short-eared-owls

Check out our Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/ProjectWAFLS/

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